Win free tickets to see ‘The Way, My Way’ film

Enter the competition to win one of 8 Double Passes to see the movie THE WAY, MY WAY. To win simply join as a Supporter of Walking SA or be a current Supporter of Walking SA and fill in the competition entry below.

From writer and director Bill Bennett, THE WAY, MY WAY is the charming and captivating true story of a stubborn, self-centred Australian man who decides to walk the famed 800-kilomtere-long Camino de Santigo pilgrimage route through Spain. He doesn’t know why he’s going it…but one step at a time, it will change him and his outlook on life forever.

Based on Bill Bennett’s best-selling book of the same name, the film stars Chris Haywood, Jennifer Cluff, Pia Thunderbolt and Laura Lakshmi and is releasing in Australian cinemas on May 16.

Double your chances to win by inviting a friend to become a Supporter so they too can also enter the draw!

Prizes drawn 2pm Tuesday 14th May 2024.

Competition is open to current Supporter for $22. Supporters help us achieve our vision of seeing “more people walking more often”.






  • Your phone number will only be used to contact you should you win a prize in the competition.
  • This field is for validation purposes and should be left unchanged.


Terms & Conditions

The competition is to win in-season tickets for the THE WAY, MY WAY film. There are 8 double pass tickets available. The tickets are a double pass digital admission valid from opening day May 16, 2024. The tickets are valid at most major cinemas and can be used at the chosen session of the ticket holder during the in-season screening period. Some other T&Cs apply including restrictions on use on discount days or ‘special’ screenings such as gold class.

To be eligible to win, people entering the competition must be a financial Supporter of Walking SA, which has not expired at the time of the draw.

To be eligible to win, people must enter the competition using the form above, entering anytime from Wednesday 24th April 2024 until 2:00pm ACST Tuesday 14th May 2024.

Employees, contractors and volunteers of Walking SA are not eligible to enter.

Join online as a Supporter prior to 2:00pm ACST Tuesday 14th May 2024 and you will be automatically entered into the draw twice. This includes any existing financially valid Supporters.

Prizes cannot be exchanged for another product. The prize is not redeemable for a voucher or cash.

Winners will be randomly selected by a Walking SA representative, and will be drawn at 2:00pm ACST Tuesday 14th May 2024. Walking SA’s decision is final and binding and no correspondence will be entered into.

Winners may be listed on social media. Winners will be contacted by phone and/or email. The winner will be sent the prize by email. Entrants agree to make their entries available for educational and statistical opportunities at the discretion of Walking SA. Entrants who win a prize also agree to make their entries available for marketing opportunities at the discretion of Walking SA.

The promoters are:

  • Walking SA Inc, Level 1, 155-159 Hutt Street, Adelaide SA 5000. Phone 0457 006 620. ABN 78 019 005 437.

Entry into this promotion is deemed acceptance of these terms and conditions.

Success of WalkFest in showcasing walking

WalkFest 2024 was proudly brought to the South Australian community by Walking SA and our Principal Partner – National Parks and Wildlife Service (NPWS).

With the unrivalled splendour of the natural Belair National Park environment the crowd was wooed, wowed, and walking on a day of glorious weather.  An audience of more than 2,000 enjoyed the festival atmosphere.

The Walks Program had 23 walks including a children’s nature-based walk and talk, First Nations and all accessible walk experiences, and a range of length, difficulty, and immersive nature options.  Hosted walks were almost 100% subscribed.

With 37 stallholders, people were spoiled for choice with plenty of information, goods and giveaways to go around.  The free climbing wall had the kids entertained and the complimentary fruit and food vouchers kept their tummies full.  For the adults, they were torn between the sweet aroma of the morning coffee and unmistakeable call of frying onions from the BBQ.

If that wasn’t enough, a full stage program of over 20 different acts, saw the foot stomping sessions of the Argy Bargy Bush Band and the mesmerising didgeridoo playing of Robert Taylor, proud senior Kaurna man. All of that, and the official opening of the bushwalking season by the Member for Waite, Catherine Hutchesson MP.

As an annual iconic event, WalkFest remains a visual and immersive treat for the South Australian community.

See you next year!
Save the date of Sunday 6th April 2025.

Bushwalking Skills with Walking SA, Cleland National Park

Sunday 24 March 2024
Cleland National Park

Choose from two sessions:
8:30am to 11:30am, or
1pm to 4pm

Join a Walking SA Experienced Leader for a bushwalking skills session in the nature of Cleland Conservation Park, on Kaurna country.

This 3-hour small group session is designed to improve your confidence to get a bit further out on our fabulous South Australian trails. It will include a 2+ hour hike on designated trails in the park, plus some time to relax in the bush and have a chat about:

  • How to plan and be well prepared for a hike
  • How to stay comfortable while walking
  • Equipment should you take with you
  • Navigation and map resources
  • What to do in an emergency
  • Rules and guidelines about walking in parks
  • The principles of Leave No Trace
  • Walking SA
  • Bushwalking Leadership South Australia

You will need to complete the medical form to participate in this event.

This event is proudly supported by National Parks and Wildlife Service South Australia as part of the March Park of the Month.

Results of the 2023 Risky Walks survey

The vast majority of serious pedestrian crashes occur in places where there is no dedicated crossing, prompting RAA and Walking SA to remind pedestrians and drivers to share the road safely this festival season.

RAA analysis of 2018-2022 crash data has revealed that 85% of serious and fatal pedestrian crashes occurred at locations where there was no designated crossing facility such as traffic signals or a pedestrian crossing.

It comes as a recent survey from RAA and Walking SA found the most commonly raised concerns by pedestrians were safety and infrastructure related, including:

  • A lack of footpaths
  • Uneven surfaces
  • A lack of safe places to cross the road

Commonly raised locations in need of improved infrastructure included Adelphi Terrace, Glenelg; Swamp Road, Uraidla; Hindmarsh Square, Adelaide; and Port Road, between James Congdon Drive and West Terrace.

RAA Senior Traffic Engineer Matt Vertudaches said 19 pedestrians lost their lives on SA roads in 2023 – the second worst year for pedestrian fatalities since the introduction of 50km/hr default urban speed limit in 2003.

“We want to encourage as many people as possible to embrace walking and active transport during events like the Adelaide Fringe, Adelaide Festival and WOMAD, but there is a responsibility on drivers and pedestrians alike to use the road safely,” Mr Vertudaches said.

“Last year was the worst year on our roads for vulnerable road users in a quarter of a century, so we all need to be aware of the risks that come with more people moving around busy streets.

“The feedback we’ve received from pedestrians tells us safe crossing locations and footpaths are the most important factors in helping them feel safe when they’re walking for travel or recreation.

“This concern is backed up by crash data – more than 360 pedestrians were either seriously injured on lost their lives on South Australian roads between 2018-2022.

“With our streets set to be bustling over this period, we’re encouraging pedestrians to use designated crossings wherever possible, and reminding drivers to be extra careful when driving through the city.

“Motorists should remember their responsibilities to give way to pedestrians when turning left and right, and when leaving a property or carpark.”

The 2018-2022 crash data also shows more than 50% of pedestrian fatalities occur at night, indicating the greater risk to vulnerable road users when visibility is low.

It also shows drugs or alcohol were involved in 39 per cent of pedestrian fatalities – up from the 33 per cent average across all road user deaths.

Walking SA Executive Director Sharon Kelsey said the survey findings would inform future advocacy priorities.

“Our South Australian community have been keen contributors to this survey and their ongoing support means we can continue to identify hot spots that might otherwise dissuade walking,” Ms Kelsey said.

“Walking has numerous health, wellbeing and social benefits – a safe network of streets and trails means we can all enjoy the great outdoors.

“This helps our neighbourhoods, our city centre and our regional areas thrive – foot traffic is the best traffic!”

Best spots to camp or caravan and explore local trails

Spend a couple of days or a weekend camping or staying in your caravan at one of these key campsites and explore nearby trails on foot. No need to hop in your vehicle, most of these hikes can be done from the doorstep of your tent or caravan.

17 Campsites to camp at to explore 69 local hiking trails

1. Cobbler Hill Campground

Cobbler Hill Campground, Deep Creek National Park

Set up camp in this small campground of just six sites, with a great loop walk to see spectacular views of the coastline.

Access by 2WD and 4WD. All sites suitable for tents. Some site suitable for camper vans, camper trailers and caravans. Facilities include long-drop toilet. Campfires allowed in fire pits (seasonal fire restrictions apply). Book with National Parks and Wildlife Service SA before you go.

Explore the nearby trails:

Blowhole Beach – Cobbler Hill – Marrano Creek Hike

Blowhole Beach – Cobbler Hill – Marrano Creek Hike

6.7km, 3.5 hours

Taking in the scrub, sandy beaches and open coastal hills of Deep Creek National Park. Walk through scrub and wildlife, visit the sandy Blowhole Beach, and return via open grassy hills.

This hike starts from the campground.

Aaron Creek Circuit Hike

Aaron Creek Circuit Hike

Walk suitable for children

6km, 3 hours

Explore the grasslands with views and kangaroos, before descending into Aaron Creek with its lush vegetation and winter waterfall. Take a picnic along to enjoy at the picnic table at Eagle Waterhole Campground.

The trail starts from the Aaron Creek Pinic Area and carpark, near Goondooloo Cottage on Blowhole Beach Road. A shorter version of the hike would be to start from Cobbler Hill Campground, and follow the Heysen Trail to Eagle Waterhole campground and return. You can also do the full loop by following the Heysen Trail for about 1km until it reaches the Aaron Creek Circuit Hike.

Drone photo of roof top tent camping in Deep Creek sourced from the South Australia Media Gallery, BRZY PTY LTD

2. Tapanappa Campground

Tapanappa Campground, Deep Creek National Park

Set up camp with just a short walk to see spectacular views of the coastline at Tapanappa Campground. There are seventeen allocated campsites, offering some shelter for tents by the low coastal vegetation.

Access by 2WD and 4WD. All sites suitable for tents. Some sites suitable for small camper vans and camper trailers. Facilities include long-drop toilet, picnic shelter. Each site has a campfire pit (seasonal fire restrictions apply). Book with National Parks and Wildlife Service SA before you go.

A short walk leads to five walking trail options:

Deep Creek Waterfall Hike from Tapanappa Lookout

Deep Creek Waterfall Hike from Tapanappa Lookout

6.6km, 3.5 hours return

Hike down into the valley to see Deep Creek Waterfall through gullies with moist forest. The trail is well graded.

Deep Creek Cove Hike from Tapanappa Lookout

Deep Creek Cove Hike from Tapanappa Lookout

3.2km, 2.5 hours return

Hike to a secluded cove where Deep Creek meets the ocean. Enjoy views of the ocean as you descend.

Deep Creek Circuit Hike

Deep Creek Circuit Hike

12km, 4-7 hour hike

Circuit hike taking in a waterfall with permanent pool, coastal views, rocky beach with creek outlet, well maintained trails with a diversity of ecosystems. Yacka hillsides, grassy hilltops, humid forest, tall stands of eucaplypts.

Boat Harbor Hike

Boat Harbor Hike

7.8km, 4 hours return

Enjoy a well-graded trail with breathtaking views of Kangaroo Island, The Pages Islands and Tunkalilla Beach. Watch out for dolphins at Boat Harbor Beach.

Boat Harbor Circuit Hike

Boat Harbor Circuit Hike

9.4km, 4 -5 hours circuit

A longer circuit hike down to Boat Harbor. A well-graded trail with breathtaking views of Kangaroo Island, The Pages Islands and Tunkalilla Beach, returning via fire tracks.

Forest Circuit Walk, Stringybark Campsite, Deep Creek3. Stringybark Campground

Stringybark Campground, Deep Creek National Park

Nestled amongst tall stringybark trees, Stringybark Campground has sixteen allocated campsites with plenty of shade and wind protection.

Access by 2WD and 4WD. All sites suitable for tents. Some sites suitable for camper vans, camper trailers and caravans. Facilities include flushing toilets, hot showers, picnic tables. Each site has a campfire pit (seasonal fire restrictions apply). Book with National Parks and Wildlife Service SA before you go.

There are two walking trails that start from the campsite, and another trail one a short walk away:

Forest Circuit Walk, Stringybark Campsite, Deep Creek

Forest Circuit Walk

Walk suitable for children

2.7km, 1 hour circuit

Enjoy an easy stroll through the stringybark forest near Stringybark Campsite. The walk is suitable for children, explore the forest, mushrooms and birdlife. The walk is especially enjoyable near sunset and sunrise.

Spring Wildflower Walk, Stringybark Campsite, Deep Creek

Spring Wildflower Walk

Walk suitable for children

4.7km, 2.5 hour return

Enjoy a walk through the regenerating forest. Watch out for echidnas, kangaroos and birdlife. During late winter and spring you’ll see wildflowers along this trail.

Stringybark Loop Walk

Stringybark Loop Walk

Walk suitable for children

900m, 30 mins

Explore the old shady growth stringybark forest, admiring the tall trees and delicate ferns. The stringybark trees in this remnant forest are some of the oldest in South Australia and provide nesting hollows for a variety of birds, including the yellow-tailed black-cockatoo. The walk is ideal for families as it is gentle.

Access the walk from the carpark on Tapanappa Road, which is a 300m walk from Stringybark Campground.

Camping in Belair National Park4. Belair National Park Holiday Park

Belair National Park Holiday Park

Walk suitable for dog walking

Set up a tent or take the caravan and camp in the caravan park. With the entrance to Belair National Park on your doorstep, just a short walk leads to seven trails to explore the in the national park.

Powered or unpowered campsites, glamping tents, cottages and cabins available. Book direct with the caravan park.

A short walk leads to seven walking trail options:

Lorikeet Loop Walk, Belair National Park

Lorikeet Loop Walk

Walk suitable for prams and strollers Walk suitable for those with mobility issues including wheelchairs Walk suitable for dog walking Walk suitable for children

3km, 1h 25mins

Wind your way past Old Government House, State Flora Nursery, and adventure playground. The wide gravelled surface is suitable for most abilities, and for strollers. There are numerous flat rocks scattered along the trail for suitable as seating rest spots.

Birdie Loop Walk, on the former Belair Golf Course

Birdie Loop Walk, on the former Belair Golf Course

Walk suitable for dog walking Walk suitable for mountain biking

2.75km, 45mins return

Explore the greens and fairways of what was the Belair Golf Course. Follow the loop to stroll past the remnant grey box woodlands and open grassy areas, which were previously fairways. This gentle loop is great for a quick stroll with your dog (on lead), or a bike ride with the family.

Wood Duck Walk, Belair National Park

Wood Duck Walk

Walk suitable for prams and strollers Walk suitable for those with mobility issues including wheelchairs Walk suitable for dog walking Walk suitable for children

1km, 30 mins

Just a 500 metre walk from the caravan park this pleasant walk around Playford Lake is popular with young children, people with prams, people with limited mobility, including wheelchairs, and those who want to experience the park’s wildlife, including the ducks on the lake. You can walk your dog in this park providing it remains under your control on a lead.

Valley Loop Hike, Belair National Park

Valley Loop Hike

Walk suitable for prams and strollers Walk suitable for dog walking Walk suitable for children

3km, 1 hour

Just a 900 metre walk along trails from the caravan park the Valley Loop Hike follows the forested banks and lower slopes of Minnow Creek and passes the Railway Dam, with ducks and seating. The trail is suitable for most strollers.

Heritage Tree Walk, Belair National Park

Heritage Tree Walk

Walk suitable for prams and strollers Walk suitable for dog walking Walk suitable for children

1km, 20 minutes

Just a 2km walk along trails from the caravan park the Valley Loop Hike easy walk winds its way around prominent heritage trees such as oak, poplar, sequoia, cork oak, pine and horse chestnut. Suitable for most strollers.

Microcarpa Hike, Belair National Park

Microcarpa Hike

Walk suitable for prams and strollers Walk suitable for dog walking

4.5km, 1hr 45mins

Just a 500 metre walk along trails from the caravan park the Microcarpa Hike is through one of the most diverse and best-preserved woodland areas remaining in the Mount Lofty Ranges. An off-road stroller would be suitable in dry conditions.

Waterfall Hike, Belair National Park

Waterfall Hike

Walk suitable for dog walking

6.5km, 3 hours

Walk along trails for 1.2km from the caravan park the Waterfall Hike is most challenging trail in the park takes you through Echo Tunnel and to the picturesque rock escarpments of the Upper and Lower Waterfalls.

Camping at Chookarloo5. Chookarloo Campground

Chookarloo Campground, Kuitpo Forest Reserve

Walk suitable for dog walking

Camp in the forest with two nearby trails and four trails a short drive away. The TreeClimb Kuitpo Forest is also located near the campsite. There are twenty-one allocated campsites set amongst the forest.

Access by 2WD and 4WD. Facilities include hybrid toilet system with disability access, picnic tables and rainwater. Each site has a campfire pit (seasonal fire restrictions apply). Camping is permitted from 1 April to 30 November annually. Book with Forestry SA.

Chookarloo Walk, Kuitpo Forest

Chookarloo Walk

Walk suitable for dog walking Walk suitable for children Walk suitable for mountain biking Walk suitable for cycling

1.1km, 30mins

Experience the pine forest and native scrub around Chookarloo Campground on this short walk. The walk starts from the Chookarloo Campground at one of the footbridges, entering the dark forest shady forest. The circuit is great for kids, offering lots of fallen trees and other nature place experiences.

Forest Trail, Kuitpo Forest

Forest Trail

Walk suitable for dog walking Walk suitable for mountain biking

2.8km, 1.5 hours

With just a 400 metre walk along forest trails you can reach the Forest Trail. Explore the native and pine forests forest in you can reach the Kuitpo Forest on the Forest Trail. A shared-use trail is for walkers, horse riders and mountain bikers. Start the hike from the Avenues picnic area which has toilets and fire pits in the picnic area.

Tinjella Trail

Tinjella Trail

Walk suitable for dog walking Walk suitable for mountain biking

12km, 4 hours

Just a 4km drive down the road is the Tinjella Trail, a meandering loop trail following forest trails and paths through Kuitpo Forest. A multi-use frail for walkers, cyclists and horse riders.

Onkeeta Trail, Kuitpo Forest

Onkeeta Trail

Walk suitable for dog walking Walk suitable for mountain biking

10.8km, 3 hours

Just a 6km drive away is the Onkeeta Trail, a meandering loop trail following forest trails and paths through northern Kuitpo Forest.

Mulurus Hike, Kyeema Conservation Park

Mulurus Hike, Kyeema Conservation Park

1.3km, 30mins return

Just a 12km drive in the nearby Kyeema Conservation Park is the short Mulurus Hike. Enjoy a short loop through the Cup Gum woodland. Watch out for birdlife, and wildflowers during Spring.

Myrtaceae Hike, Kyeema Conservation Park

Myrtaceae Hike, Kyeema Conservation Park

5.8km, 2.5 hours

Just a 12km drive in the nearby Kyeema Conservation Park is the longer Myrtaceae Hike. Explore further into Kyeema Conservation Park. The trail follows some of the Heysen Trail, before following some walking trail further west, returning along fire tracks.

Wirra Campground, Para Wirra Conservation Park6. Wirra Campground

Wirra Campground, Para Wirra Conservation Park

Walk suitable for dog walking

Situated on the eastern side of the park amongst the pink gums, grass trees and hop bush, this campground has nineteen campsites, including some camp sites that are suitable for small camper vans (RVs) and camper trailers. Camping here is convenient for city-dwellers, families and first-time campers. It’s located just south-east of Gawler and is one of the closest places to Adelaide that you can camp in a national park.

You are allowed to camp with your dog at Wirra Campground but please ensure it remains on a lead no longer than 2 metres and under your control at all times.

Access by 2WD and 4WD. Facilities include toilets and a camp kitchen. Each site has a campfire pit (seasonal fire restrictions apply). Book with National Parks and Wildlife Service SA before you go.

A short walk leads to five walking trail options:

Tree Creeper Loop, Para Wirra

Tree Creeper Loop

Walk suitable for dog walking

5km, 2 hours

Just a short 150m leads to the easy Tree Creeper Loop that meanders through the open scrub of the park. The walk is generally flat and along fire track.

Hissey Hike, Para Wirra

Hissey Hike

Walk suitable for dog walking Walk suitable for children

2.4km, 1 hour loop

A 1.2km walk along trails leads to the Hissey Hike around the main Lake and along the shaded Wild Dog Creek.

Lake Discovery Walk, Para Wirra

Lake Discovery Walk

Walk suitable for those with mobility issues including wheelchairs Walk suitable for dog walking Walk suitable for children Walk suitable for cycling

1km, 30 mins

A 1.2km walk along trails leads to the Lake Discovery Walk. This popular short trail is great for families where you can soak up the tranquil setting of Para Wirra’s lake. Wheelchair accessible. Great for walking with small kids as they ride their bikes.

South Para Grand Hike, Para Wirra

South Para Grand Hike

Walk suitable for dog walking

10km, 4.5 hours

A 1.2km walk along trails leads to the South Para Grand Hike. Descend into Wild Dog Creek at the northern end of this hike, and glimpse views of Devils Nose from below as you gradually countour around on the ascent to the lookout. The Hissey Trail walks around the main Lake.

Warren to Para Wirra via South Para

Southern Barossa Linkage Trails

20km one-way, 6.5 hours one-way

A short 150 metre walks leads the trailhead of the Southern Barossa Linkage Trail Warren to Para Wirra via South Para. This longer trails connects with other trails within the Southern Barossa Linkage Trails, including a the hikers-only Karrawirra-tya-illa Campground in Old Kersbrook Forest and the Rocky Paddock Campsite.

Rocky Paddock Campground, Mount Crawford Forest7. Rocky Paddock Campground

Rocky Paddock Campground, Mount Crawford Forest

Walk suitable for dog walking

Rocky Paddock Campground is set within a pleasant mature pine plantation backdrop and has been voted among RAA Magazine’s Top 10 Australian Campgrounds – and for good reason! It offers basic bush camping among old pine plantation and unique rocky outcrops.

There are thirty allocated campsites set amongst the forest. Access by 2WD and 4WD. Facilities include hybrid toilet system with disability access, picnic tables and rainwater. Each site has a campfire pit (seasonal fire restrictions apply). Camping is permitted from 1 April to 30 November annually. Book with Forestry SA.

A short walk leads to five walking trail options:

River Loop, Warren Reservoir

River Loop, Warren Reservoir

Walk suitable for mountain biking

8.8km, 2 hour circuit

You can walk for 3km along the Warren to Para Wirra via South Para trail (part of the Southern Barossa Linkage Trails) from Rocky Paddock Campsite to reach the River Loop. The loop meanders through plantation forest, redgums, blackwoods and silky tea tree communities. Watch for yellow-tailed black cockatoos and enjoy the sound of the wind whistling through the pines.

Heysen Trail Loop through Mount Crawford

Heysen Trail Loop through Mount Crawford

Walk suitable for dog walking Walk suitable for children

13km, 7 hours

This Heysen Trail Loop passes directly through the campsite. Walk through the native and plantation forests. Highlights include the native forest along the ridgeline up to Little Mount Crawford, and the open plantation forest between Rocky Paddock Campsite and Chalks Campsite.

Warren to Para Wirra via South Para

Warren to Para Wirra via South Para trail

20km one-way, 6.5 hours one-way

A short 600 metre walks leads to the Warren to Para Wirra via South Para trail (part of the Southern Barossa Linkage Trails). This longer trails connects with other trails within the Southern Barossa Linkage Trails, including a the hikers-only Karrawirra-tya-illa Campground in Old Kersbrook Forest and the Wirra Campground in Para Wirra Conservation Park.

Mambray Creek camping, Mt Remarkable National Park8. Mambray Creek Campground9. Baroota Campground

Mambray Creek Campground or Baroota Campground, Mount Remarkable National Park

Camp in a wildlife wonderland at the recently renewed Mambray Creek Campground, or camp at the nearby Baroota Campground.

Mambray Creek Campground is nestled amongst river red gums. With 49 campsites that are level and offer varied amounts of shade and protection from the wind.

Access by 2WD and 4WD. Heavy duty tent pegs and mallett are required. Sites suitable for tents, camper trails with some selected sites suitable for caravans. Facilities at Mambray Creek Campground include two fully accessible shower blocks, each with six hot water showers and five toilets, and a 4-cubicle toilet block. Camp kitchen with food preparation and dishwashing facilities. Picnic furniture and shelters throughout the site. Facilities at Baroota Campground include toilets. Each site at both campgrounds has a campfire pit (seasonal fire restrictions apply). Book Mambray Creek Campground or Baroota Campground with National Parks and Wildlife Service SA before you go.

A short walk leads to five walking trail options:

Wirra Water Loop, Mambray Creek

Wirra Water Loop, Mambray Creek

Walk suitable for prams and strollers Walk suitable for those with mobility issues including wheelchairs Walk suitable for children

1.6km, 30 mins return

Explore the child-friendly mobility-accessible Wirra Water Loop with interpretive signs, or walk further and explore the ruins and cemetery on the Baroota Hike.

Baroota Hike, Mambray Creek

Baroota Hike, Mambray Creek

Walk suitable for children

6km, 2 hours return

Follow the Mambray Creek Walk then continue along a natural trail to visit Baroota Ruins, the Old Baroota Cemetery and the Baroota Ruins Campground.

Sugar Gum Lookout Hike

Sugar Gum Lookout Hike

8km, 3 hours return

An easy hike along the valley of Mambray Creek with a short but strenuous climb to the lookout.

Hidden Gorge Hike, Mambray Creek

Hidden Gorge Hike, Mambray Creek

18km, 7 hours

Discover the narrow gorges, and views from The Battery. 7 hours return, 18km circuit bushwalk, options to extend by camping and walking on to Alligator Gorge.

Daveys Gully Hike

Daveys Gully Hike

Walk suitable for children

2.4km, 1 hour return

The walk explores the gully above the Mambray Creek Picnic Area. It’s a gentle gradient with great views into the Alligator Basin and across Spencer Gulf.

10. Melrose Caravan Park

Melrose Caravan & Tourist Park

Walk suitable for dog walking

Nestled in the spectacular Southern Flinders Ranges at the foot of Mount Remarkable, the caravan park provides a quiet, scenic park with easy access to nearby trails in Mount Remarkable National Park.

Set up a tent or caravan and camp powered or unpowered on lawn, or unpowered in the bush camping area. Cabins also available. Book direct with the caravan park.

Melrose Nature Hike

Melrose Nature Hike

2.6km, 1.5-3 hours

Enjoy a walk from the caravan park through the foothills of Mt Remarkable on the Melrose Nature Hike. The trail visits Cathedral Rock, where there is a picnic area.

Mount Remarkable Summit Loop (Northern Summit Trail & Southern Summit Trail)

Mount Remarkable Summit Loop (Northern Summit Trail & Southern Summit Trail)

13.8km, 5 hours return

Walk out from the bush camping area of the caravan park and hike along the Heysen Trail up to the summit of Mt Remarkable. The trail is gently graded as it contours up to the summit. There are two route choices the the summit (Northern Summit Trail & Southern Summit Trail), allowing hikers to walk one trail out-and-back or complete the whole loop.

Monitor Loop, Willowie Forest

Willowie Forest

Walk suitable for mountain biking

Walk 9km along the Melrose to Wilmington Cycle and Walking Track (Southern Flinders Rail Trail) to reach Willowie Forest, which offers three choices of walking trails. You can also drive the 9km drive up the road towards Wilmington to reach the Willowie Forest.

The Echidna Loop is short loop that circles formerly cleared cropping land of the farm. The walk passes a collection of old farm machinery.

The Monitor Loop trail meanders along the foothills of the Mount Remarkable Range. The trail crosses several shallow watercourses and reaches the highest areas of Willowie Forest.

The Possum Loop trail heads out to the north of the forest then connects to the Southern Flinders Rail Trail (Melrose – Wilmington Rail Trail) and returns south to the car park.

11. Wilpena Pound Resort

Wilpena Pound Resort, Ikara-Flinders Ranges National Park

Camp within the cypress-pines or stay in the motel or resort at the Wilpena Pound Resort. Nestled next to the Pound Gap, there are seven trails on your doorstep.

You can also camp in one of the ten campsites within the Ikara-Flinders Ranges National Park.

Access by 2WD and 4WD. Book with the resort.

Hills Homestead Walk

Hills Homestead Walk

6.6km, 2 hours return

Walk through the tranquil Pound Gap into Wilpena Pound. The walk begins from the trailhead at the Wilpena Visitor Centre. The start of the walk is through the Pound Gap, following Wilpena Creek through tall river red gums and pines. Choose to continue along the walking trail, which is easier, or along the dirt road which climbs above Sliding Rock – watch out for kangaroos and echidnas. The walk continues to Hills Homestead, where you can read about the original inhabitants of the cottage and their struggles with the harsh Australian conditions.

Wangara Lookout Hike

Wangara Lookout Hike

7km, 3-3.5 hours return. 7.0km return (upper lookout), 6.2km return (lower lookout)

Walk through the Pound Gap into Wilpena Pound, and up to one of the Wangara Lookouts for panoramic views into the inside of Wilpena Pound.

Boom and Bust Hike

Boom and Bust Hike

3.0km, 2 hours return

Take the short loop trail near the main Visitor Centre that contains a wide array of flora with a colourful display of wildflowers present in spring months. There are plenty of interpretive signs along the way outlining the wildlife and habitat. The start of the Boom and Bust Hike follows main trail through the Pound Gap then turns off onto the Mount Ohlssen Bagge Hike before looping back to the Pound Gap.

Mount Ohlssen Bagge Hike

Mount Ohlssen Bagge Hike

5.6km, 4 hours return, 5.6km return

A steep rocky climb to the summit of Mount Ohlssen Bagge, with rewarding views both inside and outside the Pound. Look for reptiles along the way.

Bridle Gap Hike

Bridle Gap Hike

18.6km, 6 hours return

Experience some of the iconic 1,200km Heysen Trail by walking out to Bridle Gap, on the south-western escarpment edge of Wilpena Pound. The trail passes through the Pound Gap and past Hills Homestead, contining across the Pound floor. A variety of mallee, native pine and heath habitats provide excellent opportunities for keen naturalists to observe local birds including wrens, robins, parrots and raptors.

St Mary Peak Hike, Ngarri Mudlanha, Wilpena Pound

St Mary Peak Hike, Ngarri Mudlanha

19km, 9 hours return

Challenging hike to the summit of St Mary Peak, the highest mountain in the Flinders Ranges. Rewarding panoramic views.

St Mary Peak is central to the Adnyamathanha creation story. For this reason the Adnyamathanha people of the Flinders Ranges would prefer that visitors do not climb to the summit of the peak (beyond Tanderra Saddle). The shorter option to Tanderra Saddle also affords spectacular views.

This hike is closed from 30th November to 1st March each year.

Malloga Falls Hike

Malloga Falls Hike

23.2km, 9 hours return

Explore the more remote trail out to Malloga Falls and Edeowie Gorge by traversing the floor of the Pound and walking out to the deep Edeowie Gorge on the north western edge. The Malloga Falls are a set of adjacent twin falls, but are usually dry. The trail is 23.2km and 9 hours return and is recommended for walkers with some experience as the trail can be hard to follow in some spots.

The trail is closed during summer months of December, January and February.

12. Pink Gum Campground

Pink Gum Campground, Onkaparinga River National Park

Located just beyond Adelaide’s southern suburbs, Pink Gum Campground offers a quiet getaway from suburban life.

The River Hike sets out from the campground. Within a short drive you can reach several other nearby trails or explore McLaren Vale.

The campground offers eleven allocated camp sites and is accessible by 2WD. The campground is suitable for tents, camper trailers and caravans. Facilities include flushing toilet and wash-up facility. Each site has a campfire pit (seasonal fire restrictions apply). Book with National Parks and Wildlife Service SA before you go.

River Hike, Onkaparinga Gorge

River Hike

4.2km, 2.5 hours

Starting from the campground you can walk down into Onkaparinga Gorge, experiencing spectacular views across the gorge and walking to the edge of waterholes. This area has the most intact native vegetation in the park. It starts off along gentle slopes, but becomes steeper as you descend into the gorge.

Hardys Scrub Hike

Hardys Scrub Hike

5.9km, 2-3 hours

Drive less than 3km down the road to reach the Hardys Scrub Hike. Wander through this forest on walking trails and fire tracks. The trail is well marked. We recommend this extra eastern trail as especially delightful to walk through, with some good views.

Chapel Hill Lookout Loop

Chapel Hill Lookout Loop

1.6km, 45 mins return

Drive 6km down the road to reach the Chapel Hill Lookout Loop. Walk across the gentle slopes of the upper gorge to enjoy views from the lookout deep into the river gorge below.

Walking loop of Manning Flora & Fauna Reserve, McLaren Vale

Walking loop of Manning Flora & Fauna Reserve

2.3km, 45 mins

Drive 6km towards McLaren Vale to reach the Manning Flora & Fauna Reserve. Explore the varied natural vegetation in the reserve. This small park, surrounded by vineyards, is a pink gum woodland, with a variety of other flowering plants such as silver and desert banksia which are especially common in winter. There is no marked walking trail, but a Y-shaped fire track, and a perimeter fire track.

13. Waitpinga Campground

Waitpinga Campground, Newland Head Conservation Park

Just a short walk from Waitpinga Beach, this campground is sheltered from the wind where you can camp among the mallee or in open areas protected by shrubs.

Explore two shorter trails and longer trail from the trailhead in the campground, or walk the 600 metres to Waitpinga Beach (where there are ideal conditions for surfing or a spot of fishing, but not suitable for swimming.)

There are no allocated sites within this campground and vehicles have to be parked at car parking bays.

Access by 2WD and 4WD. Suitable for tents or swags. Facilities include flushing toilets, communal bbq and picnic shelter and tables and a rainwater tank. Campfires are not permitted throughout the year. Book an unallocated campsite with National Parks and Wildlife Service SA before you go.

Coastal Cliffs Walking Trail, Newland Head

Coastal Cliffs Walking Trail

8.6km, 2-3 hours

Enjoy a walk from Waitpinga Campground out to the cliffs of Waitpinga. An easily followed loop hike along some of the Heysen Trail, before returning inland via a fire track.

Ridgeway Hill Walking Trail, Newland Head

Ridgeway Hill Walking Trail

7.5km, 2-3 hours

Enjoy a loop hike through the quieter areas of the park. The trail follows fire tracks and walking trails. Keep an eye out for echidnas and kangaroos.

Waitpinga Cliffs to Kings Beach, Heysen Trail

Waitpinga Cliffs to Kings Beach, Heysen Trail

11.5km one-way, 4-6 hours one way

A spectacular trail from Waitpinga Campground, along the Waitpinga Cliffs. Keep an eye out for white-bellied sea-eagles, one of a just a few breeding pairs of sea-eagles on the mainland inhabit the cliffs here.

The full trail goes to Kings Beach, which is 11.5km one-way, so a 23km return walk. You can make the hike shorter by turning around at the cliffs lookout and picnic table, which makes at 7.5km one-way / 15km return walk.

14. Bundaleer

Bundaleer Sport & Rec Grounds, Bundaleer Forest

Walk suitable for dog walking

Camp in Bundaleer Forest and explore four nearby trails. Bundaleer Forest is near Jamestown, about 200km north of Adelaide.

The Bundaleer Sport & Rec Grounds (sometimes known as the Bundaleer Forest Campground) is unallocated camping on a former oval (grassy not lawned), and bookings and maintenance are managed by the volunteer-run Bundaleer Forest Community Areas Association (BFCAA). Facilities include toilets.

The campground is near the newly built Maple & Pine event centre and nature play area built by the Bundaleer Forest Community Areas Association (BFCAA).

Maple Walk, Bundaleer Forest

Maple Walk

Walk suitable for dog walking

1.5km, 30-45 minutes

This trail starts from the campground or Maple & Pine event centre and nature play area. Explore the forest around the Bundaleer Picnic Grounds on this delightful walk, following a walking trail up the meandering creek, returning on the other side. There are numerous interpretive signs along the way detailing the tree species and other flora and fauna. The walk begins from the picnic grounds, and is a loop so can be walked in either direction.

Sculpture Walk, Bundaleer Forest

Sculpture Walk

Walk suitable for dog walking

850m, 25 minutes

This trail starts from the campground or Maple & Pine event centre and nature play area. Explore the many large sculptures in the forest around the Bundaleer Picnic Grounds. Highlights include the interactive Musical Sculpture, the Postcards Sculpture and Placemarker Sculpture. The walk begins from the picnic grounds. Cross the creek to the south to start the trail.

Conservator’s Trail, Bundaleer Forest

Conservator’s Trail

Walk suitable for dog walking Walk suitable for mountain biking

4.6km, 1.5 hours

Starting from a trailhead a few hundred metres down the road from the campground, climb high above the picnic grounds on this walk through Bundaleer Forest. Highlights include The Forest Temple of the Sun lookout, located along a 1800s stone wal, the Conservator’s Hut, built in 1890, and the Arboretum, first planted in 1876. The walk begins from Gate BN12, also labelled with Bundaleer Greenway Mawson Trail signs, on the main Springs Road dirt road, just 150m beyond the entrance to the picnic grounds.

Scenic Trail, Bundaleer Forest

Scenic Trail

Walk suitable for dog walking Walk suitable for mountain biking

4.6km, 1.5 hours

This trail starts from the campground or Maple & Pine event centre and nature play area. Explore some of the pine plantation forest and native forest areas of the Bundaleer Forest, as you head south from the Picnic Grounds. Much of this trail is on leased forest, so you will need to stick to the trails. The walk begins from the picnic grounds. Cross the creek to the south to start the trail.

Hiltaba Nature Reserve, Eyre Peninsula15. Hiltaba Nature Reserve

Hiltaba Nature Reserve, Eyre Peninsula

Hiltaba Nature Reserve is at the western edge of the Gawler Ranges and is home to numerous species of conservation significance. Adjoining the Gawler Ranges National Park, the unique geological formations of this reserve includes magnificent granite hills overlooking diverse grass and woodland habitat.

There are five trails within the reserve, which start from various points such as the Shearers’ Quarters and Pretty Point campgrounds. Some can be reached on foot from campgrounds, others are a short drive away.

The reserve is about 8 hours and 700km north-west of Adelaide on the Eyre Peninsula. The roads into the reserve are AWD and 4WD accessible (subject to weather conditions). The reserve cannot be access by 2WD vehicle. Some of the Nature Drives within the reserve are not accessible to AWDs.

The reserve is owned and managed by the Nature Foundation, who also manage bookings.

The reserves is open between 1 April and 31 October to day visitors, campers and visitors staying in accommodation. The reserve is closed during the summer months.

Betty and Bob Lewis Walking Trail, Hiltaba Nature Reserve

Betty and Bob Lewis Walking Trail

2km, 45 mins

The Betty and Bob Lewis Walking Trail around Pretty Point is only about 2km in length. It climbs on a marked track around the stunning granite boulders at Pretty Point. A gentle climb is rewarded with views across the rugged rocky landscapes back to the homestead, and beyond to Mount Hiltaba and Barber Hill.

Warren Bonython Walking Trail, Hiltaba Nature Reserve

Warren Bonython Walking Trail

9.3km, 3 hours 30 minutes

The Warren Bonython Walking Trail is a loop of 10km. It commences behind the Hiltaba homestead and involves a steep climb to the summit of Mt Hiltaba, (424 m) along rocky creek beds, ledges and slopes. Stop for a break at the summit and enjoy the magnificent views south to the Gawler Ranges National Park and the salt pans towards Wirrulla before commencing the rugged descent over rocky terrain. The last section returns to the homestead along the mallee slopes on the eastern flanks of Mt Hiltaba.

Barbara Hardy Walking Trail, Hiltaba Nature Reserve

Barbara Hardy Walking Trail

5.1km, 2 hours

The Barbara Hardy Walking Trail is a 7km loop trail. This well-defined trail follows a rough vehicle track for about a kilometre before climbing to a rocky ridge with views back to the homestead on the west, and out towards Lake Acraman to the east. The descent passes a spectacular rock wall before returning to the trailhead.

Mark Bonnin Walking Trails, Hiltaba Nature Reserve

Mark Bonnin Walking Trails

8.6km, 2 hours 45 mins

The Mark Bonnin Walking Trails provide an opportunity for walkers of various abilities to walk either the green route of 3 km, the blue route of 9 km or the more rugged red route of 11 km. These three trails provide the opportunity to experience different landscapes at Hiltaba: the open grasslands, casuarina, mallee and bullock bush stands and the rocky gorges. While the Lookout (a high point from which large areas of the Nature Reserve are laid out before you), is reached only by the red walk, there is an opportunity for all walkers to climb or drive to the Lookout for a chance to experience its magnificent views.

David Cleland Walking Trail, Hiltaba Nature Reserve

David Cleland Walking Trail

6.7km, 2 hours

The David Cleland Walking Trail is a linear walk of 7 km, (14 km return) launched in 2018. The trail commences at the Shearers’ Quarters and follows the wide valley dotted with wombat burrows and includes gentle climbs on the smooth sheets of Hiltaba Granite. A gentle climb through mallee slopes then passes over a ridge to the Pretty Point camping area with its distinctive granite boulders.

16. Farina Camping Ground

Farina Camping Ground, Farina

Walk suitable for dog walking

Camp in the outback in the State’s Far North at Farina. The former town is on the old alignment of the Great Northern Railway (later known as the Ghan Railway.)

Founded in the 1870s, the railway from Port Augusta reached Farina in 1882, and from 1884 continued on to Marree and Alice Springs. During the railway construction the town boomed, with a cosmopolitan population of Aborigines, Chinese, Europeans and Afghan. Early years in the town saw good unusually good rains and the town and farms flourished, but after years of drought and dust storms the town was abandoned. In 1980 a new railway to Alice Springs was built 400km to the west, and after the long years of decline the town was abandoned.

From 2009 onwards the volunteers of the Farina Restoration Group have been working on preserving and restoring some sites in the town.

The Underground Oven and Bakery often open annually from late May through to July.

The road past Farina has recently been bitumised so is considered an “all-weather” road generally accessisble by 2WD. Further north the roads are 4WD accessible. Campground facilities include hot showers and toilets. The campground is managed by the Farina Restoration Group.

There are three walking trails to explore Farina and the former railway:

Farina Town Walking Trail

Farina Town Walking Trail

1.1km, 30 – 60mins

Explore the township of Farina on the Town Walking Trail, taking in the restored buildings and ruins.

Narrow Gauge River Crossing Walk, Farina

Narrow Gauge River Crossing Walk, Farina

1.7km, 1 hour

Continue past the Farina Creek Walk to explore the original narrow gauge railway line. The trail is 1.7km long. If walked with the Farina Creek Walk from the trailhead near the campground, the total loop is 3.5km.

Farina Cemetery Walk

Farina Cemetery Walk

Walk suitable for mountain biking

1.7km, 1 hour

Walk out to the cemetery, which was used from 1878 to 1960. There are 244 names registered as buried in the district and potentially here, and are recorded on the cemetery storyboards.

Lakes Nature Walk Trail17. Hooded Plover Campground

Loop Road Hooded Plover Campground, Coorong National Park

Walk suitable for dog walking

Camp on the the Coorong, a wetland of international importance, supporting many significant and endangered flora and fauna. Visitors come for bird watching, boating, kayaking, fishing, camping, walking, four-wheel driving and European and Ngarrindjeri cultural history.

Access by 2WD and 4WD. Suitable for tents and camper trailers. Facilities include long-drop toilet, picnic shelter and rainwater. Throughout the year campfires are not permitted. Book with National Parks and Wildlife Service SA before you go.

A short walk leads to two walking trail options:

Ngrugie Ngoppun Walk

Ngrugie Ngoppun Walk

2.7km, 1 hour 15 mins

Starting from the campground is the grugie Ngoppun Walk. Ngrugie Ngoppun means ‘good walk’ in the Ngarrindjeri language. This short loop offers wildlife viewing and access to some local history. This easy short walk commences in the heart of Salt Creek and follows a path through low scrub to the point at which the Salt Creek enters the Coorong.

Lakes Nature Walk Trail

Lakes Nature Walk Trail

2.9km, 1 hour

Starting just a 200 metre walk down the road is the Lakes Nature Walk Trail. The trail is a gentle, pleasant walk past ephemeral lakes, through mallee scrub and over low sand dunes. The trail begins from a carpark on the Loop Road.

‘Walk On Water’ Myponga Reservoir Enjoy, Explore, Preserve – FREE EVENT

10am Sunday 25 February 2024
Myponga Reservoir
Two walk options: 4km and 8km

Everybody is welcome to join Walking SA and SA Water to explore the unique Myponga Reservoir environment. The free public walk will start at 10am with a short (4k) and a longer (8k) walk.

All walkers need to register so we can keep everyone updated if there is any change (ie due to a Fire Ban or extreme weather conditions etc.)

This Free Public Walk event is hosted by Walking SA in conjunction with SA Water – Reservoirs South Australia. The walk will commence at 10 am from the car park at the top of the track entered from Eatts Street, Myponga.

If you’re looking to explore other reservoirs we’ve recently updated trail entries on our website to include 24 trails across 8 reservoirs.

Vale Tuesday Udell

Tuesday UdellJust before Christmas we heard the sad news that our former Chair, Tuesday Udell, had finally succumbed to the cancer.  It was five years and nine months since she was first diagnosed, and in that time she lived life to the fullest.


Tuesday had joined the Walking SA Board the year before, in 2017.  Tuesday served as Chair from 2018 to 2022, for much of the period undergoing treatment.  At times committee meetings were scheduled around treatment sessions.  Tuesday loved walking, and despite her illness she managed to organise and participate in walks, both for Walking SA and with her many friends.  She also kept up her relentless advocacy.  If not for her, the State government would not have developed and adopted the South Australian Walking Strategy, 2022-2032.

Tuesday began her working career in computer science, but after deciding that she wanted to do something that would be more meaningful for her, she undertook a course in nutrition.  This eventually led her to work for the Heart Foundation, where she quickly established herself nationally as an advocate for physical activity as well as healthy eating.  She was, for example, a driving force behind two important publications used throughout Australia: Good for Busine$$: The benefits of making streets more walking and cycling friendly, and Streets for People.

Her passion and tireless activity were recognised by Walking SA with the 2022 Award for Outstanding Individual Contribution, and by the Public Health Association, with the Basil Hetzel Leadership in Public Health Award.

But for the many who gathered at her memorial service, Tuesday was simply a force of nature, inspiring some many of us to be more active in so many ways, even when she herself was battling cancer.  As a neighbour commented, “she taught me to live”.

Ian Radbone, friend and Walking SA Walking for Transport committee member


It was such sad news to hear of Tuesday’s passing, a vibrant and dynamic person taken from us all too soon.

It has been a pleasure to work with Tuesday on the Walking SA Board and to learn from her no nonsense, authentic, strategic, let’s get it done approach.  Her time as Chair was well spent.  It  saw a time of strong growth and renewed focus with the  completion of the first South Australian Walking Strategy, 2022-2032, the 2021-2025 Walking SA Strategic Plan and a greater focus on advocacy in the walking for health, transport and liveable communities space .

Although we needed little reminding of her impact on so many, Tuesday’s  memorial celebrated the highlights of a busy and purposeful life.  Truly an inspiration.  On behalf of the Walking SA community, I offer sincere condolences to Tuesday’s family and remember her always as a lifetime friend of Walking SA.

Rod Quintrell, Chair, Walking SA