Fact Sheet: Pedestrian safety and traffic crashes in metropolitan Adelaide

A review of road traffic crashes involving a pedestrian between 2013-2017

Fact Sheet - Pedestrian safety and traffic crashes in metropolitan Adelaide, A review of road traffic crashes involving a pedestrian between 2013-2017Here at Walking SA we’ve produced a one-page factsheet on crashes involving pedestrians in metropolitan Adelaide (Transport professionals prefer the term “crashes” to “accidents”, arguing that to call something an “accident” suggests that there’s nothing we could have done to avoid it.)

The factsheet uses data from the last five years to show where crashes involving pedestrians have occurred, both on a map and categorised by local council and the speed limit of the road.

The map also shows where the speed limit is 40km/h or less, and where slower speed limits are planned.

Two things stand out:

  • The City of Adelaide council is surrounded by neighbours that have at least some 40km/h zones (only the City of Burnside and City of West Torrens don’t.) All of the City of Unley’s residential streets are zone 40km/h. The City of Adelaide council by contrast sticks to 50 and 60km/h speed limits, with very limited exceptions: Victoria Square plaza, the western end of Hindley Street and the designated Shared Use Zones.
  • The City of Adelaide council has by far the highest number of pedestrian crashes of any council. In fact almost one in five pedestrians crashes for the whole State occur in the City of Adelaide council area.

The factsheet also includes a well-known graph from the State government’s Road Safety strategy that points out that your chances of surviving being hit by a car double if the speed of the vehicle is reduced from 50km/h to 40km/h.

If after looking at the fact sheet you would like further information, we have produced an interactive map for you to explore the data.

Walking SA thanks geo-spatial analyst Greg Vaughan for help in producing this factsheet.  We hope that it can be used to encourage safer speeds for pedestrians.

Walking SA Submission to 20 Year State Infrastructure Discussion Paper

Walking SA responded to a government discussion paper which outlines a plan for our state’s population growth over the next 20 years.

The paper by a newly formed independent body Infrastructure SA looked at a range of economic and social infrastructure options.

Walking SA strongly calls for walking to be considered as a fundamental form of transport and (foot) traffic, and that walking infrastructure is planned and funded accordingly.

Walkability will be key to the liveability of our state into the future.

South Australians walking for recreation and health. What would encourage them to walk more?

Walking along the River Torrens in AdelaideA recent RAA SA Active Transport survey confirmed that most people who walk do so for recreation (85%) or local trips (50%) with health/fitness (81%) and relaxation being their main motivations.

Respondents suggested that they might walk more if there were better quality footpaths (46%), lighting (35%) and pedestrian facilities along the route such as water fountains.

The most effective ways of securing safety were also footpath upgrades and lighting as well as clearing vegetation and separation from other road users that travel at higher speed.

The majority of respondents were supportive of government funding being redirected from road projects onto pedestrian infrastructure.

Call for a state-wide walking strategy

The Heart Foundation is calling for the SA State Government to develop and fund a state-wide walking strategy to increase the number of people walking in both metropolitan and regional areas.

A walking strategy would not only be good for health, but has numerous social, economic and environmental benefits. The Heart Foundation promotes the value of walkable environments across multiple Government portfolios.

What can you do? Keep walking. Write to your local council asking for better walking facilities. Write to the Health Minister asking for a walking strategy.

Walking SA supports this agenda, and will partner with the Heart Foundation to advocate and build support from our community.

Concerns about the development of private operator facilities by the Australian Walking Company on Kangaroo Island trails

Walking SA has concerns about the development of private operator facilities by the Australian Walking Company on the Kangaroo Island Wilderness Trail [reference source].

In summary:
We believe that appropriate and full consultation with all stakeholders is an essential part of any project that has community impact. We also highlight that any development of a wilderness area will have a detrimental impact upon the experience of those visiting the region. Any infrastructure should be of minimal impact on the local environment and the balance found between maintaining the environment and the walking activity that is being enhanced.

We’ve sent a letter highlighting our concerns to David Speirs MP, Minister for Environment and Water.

Key extracts of the letter are below, or view the full letter.

Walking SA believes that appropriate consultation with key stakeholders is an essential part of any project that has community impact. As a member of Friends of Parks we are concerned that the Friends of Parks communities on Kangaroo Island have not had their voice heard in an appropriate manner for the further development planned on the island contracted to the Australian Walking Company.

Walking SA has previously acknowledged the work done by your department in the establishment of the Kangaroo Island Wilderness Trail. In fact the trail was recognised in our Walking SA Walking Awards of 2016 and we have been a strong advocate of the trail at our events, on our website and through social media.

We also welcome the development of experiences that allow more demographics of people to enjoy walking, however if this is perceived to be exclusive we believe this should not be to the detriment of the broader community.

Walking SA is aware of the rising tension across Australia at present in regard to the perceived development of commercial operators infrastructure on public trails. Walking SA’s member clubs and the walking community in general believe in the “leave no trace” approach to the environment that we walk through. Any infrastructure should be of minimal impact on the local environment and the balance found between maintaining the environment and the walking activity that is being enhanced.

Walking SA also raises that any development of a wilderness area will have a detrimental impact upon the experience of those visiting the region.

Walking SA strongly encourages you as Minister to ensure there is a process for

  • The Friends of Parks communities on Kangaroo Island and other concerned citizens to have their views heard on this development, and
  • that the Department in consultation with the Kangaroo Island community work collaboratively to achieve an outcome with the Australian Walking Company that minimises the impact on the pristine Kangaroo Island environment.

Walking SA has signed the Walk 21 International Charter for Walking

Rodney Tolley (middle) with Walking SA Executive Officer, Greg Boundy, and Walking SA Chair Tuesday Udell, having signed the Walk21 International Charter for Walking

Rodney Tolley (middle) with Walking SA Executive Officer, Greg Boundy, and Walking SA Chair Tuesday Udell, having signed the Walk21 International Charter for Walking

Today we here at Walking SA have signed the Walk21 International Charter for Walking to confirm our commitment to supporting the creation of communities where people choose to walk.

We are pleased to have supported Dr Rodney Tolley’s visit to Adelaide this week. Rodney is an international expert on making communities more walkable, and has been involved in the field of active, sustainable transport for over 40 years as a researcher, international speaker and consultant. This week he presented at the Adelaide Heart Foundation’s Think Tank – Let’s Make Walking Great Again!

About the International Charter for Walking

The International Charter for Walking is a common policy reference that cities, organisations, neighbourhood groups and individuals can sign up to and encourage more everyday walking and greater walkability.

The Charter was developed during the Walk21 conference series, starting in Portland in 2003 led by Daniel Sauter from Urban Mobility Research and launched in Melbourne in 2006. It is informed by experts from more than 35 countries, identifies the needs of people on foot and provides a common framework to help authorities focus their policies, activities and relationships to create a culture where people choose to walk.

To date the Charter has been signed by more than 5,000 people including 500 Mayors. We encourage other organisations including local councils to sign it too as a common framework to creating healthy, efficient and sustainable walking communities throughout South Australia and the world.

Advocating for improved pedestrian conditions on North Terrace

We continue to advocate for improved pedestrian conditions on North Terrace, and sent this letter to the new Lord Mayor of Adelaide, Sandy Verschoor.

Key extracts of the letter are below, or view the full letter.

In 2019 our priority actions will focus around pedestrian safety in areas with high vehicle traffic.

As you would be aware the majority of pedestrian casualty crashes occur in the city centre and North Adelaide. We congratulate you on your commitment to support 40km/h throughout the city.

It is with this in mind that we write to you with our concerns with the conditions for pedestrians on North Terrace, particularly at the western end now that the New Royal Adelaide Hospital has opened.

As I am sure you are aware, there is a much higher level of pedestrian activity here since the hospital has opened. Also with heavier flows of traffic at the West Terrace/North Terrace intersection as a result of the hospital, we are concerned with implications for pedestrian safety, both at the intersection and further east.

Due to a lack of formal crossing points, pedestrians are put at risk when crossing 5 traffic lanes and 2 tram tracks over North Terrace to get to SAHMRI and nRAH. Then being penalised by sparodic punitive police measures.

We do not think that this is satisfactory, particularly given the extremely long “green man” wait times (over three minutes at times) that are endured by people walking across the West Tee-North Terrace lights (Needless to say, people walking into the area from the Park Lands and crossing West Terrace as well have much longer to wait).

We note that Council’s approval of the Mini sterial DPA for the hospital provided for lights at a pedestrian crossing at Gray Street. This was to cater for people walking between bus stops on Currie Street and the new medical and university precinct. This is yet to appear. While this would be valuable , pedestrians also need a less time-consum ing way to cross at West Terrace.

We understand that Council is working with the State government on a plan to upgrade the public realm along the western half of North Terrace. We commend this and hope that plans can be turned into firm action quickly.

Nevertheless, we cannot wait for the necessarily lengthy and delayed processes involved in a major transformation of North Terrace and call on Council to provide safe, convenient pedestrian crossings of North Terrace immediately, in advance of upgrades to the overall public realm.

To walk, or to run?

To walk, or to run? Turns out it doesn't matter, as long as your activity is aerobic - in that it raises your heart rate and gets you moving and sweating for a sustained period.

To walk, or to run?
In other words, if you’re looking to improve your health, is it better to commit to an occasional all-out sweat fest, or incorporate more walking and moving into your day?

A study suggests there’s an answer to this years-old conundrum: It doesn’t matter.

Research from the American Heart Association suggests that it doesn’t matter as long as your workouts fall into one category: aerobic exercise – defined as any movement that raises your heart rate and gets you moving and sweating for a sustained period.

Source:
Moderate‐to‐Vigorous Physical Activity and All‐Cause Mortality: Do Bouts Matter?
Published 22 Mar 2018, Journal of the American Heart Association. 2018;7:e007678

Looking for a way to build walking into your weekly schedule?

Parkrun have regular walks and runs each Saturday, social share

Are you looking for a way to build walking into your weekly schedule?

Don’t be put off by the name Parkrun, walkers are always welcome to join. They organise free, weekly, 5km timed walks or runs. They are open to everyone, free, and are safe and easy to take part in. These are set up as events usually in pleasant parklands surroundings and are run by a volunteer network.

With 32 Parkruns held each Saturday morning throughout South Australia, there’s bound to be one near you. Search for one nearby you via their map at parkrun.com.au/events, or review the list below.

Not one near you? There might be soon, Parkrun is spreading rapidly throughout South Australia, having added 12 new events in the first 9 months of this year, since starting their first one here in SA in 2012.

Throughout October we’re celebrating walking with #walktoberSA

Walking can transform your life, hear Bill’s story using walking to recover from a stroke

Walking can transform your life. Bill talks about how after suffering a stroke he felt pretty low, and to overcome how frustrated he felt he decided to start walking, at first doing small walks then slowly challenging himself to do more.

“Back then I felt pretty hopeless at walking, but now, the personal satisfaction cant be described really, it’s nature, the birds, the bees, the waterfalls, it’s freedom, it’s so beautiful. Everyday you see something that you don’t see the day before.”

Throughout October we’re celebrating walking with #walktoberSA

Transcript:

I suffered a stroke back in 2002, and for a long time I couldn’t walk and after about 12 months of that I got very frustrated, so I tried to have a go, and that’s why I started.

I was down on the beach, feeling pretty low, because I couldn’t walk properly, and I met a friend of mine, who I used to work with, who met me on the beach. He was doing a fitness walk, as people do, and he met me and wondered why I was stumbling. We got to talking and decided he would stay with me every day thereafter helping me to take another 10, 20 yards, climb these stairs, let’s not climb, let’s do another set, that’s just how it worked… and [I feel] very very lucky.

Walking now is almost a daily thing, I try and take one day off a week, I try and force myself to do that. Usually every day 7 or 8 k’s along the beach, and then once a week I try and get and up into the Hills or something and do 20 k 25 k hike.

The most challenging walk has probably been the Overland Trail in Tasmania. When I started hiking first my granddaughter joined me to help me hike, then my brother jumped in when she popped out and we both enjoyed it, so we decided to give the Overland Trail in Tasmania a go. Climbing up over Cradle Mountain and around the lake, and that was probably the most challenging, the rain, wind, you name it, we had it.

Back then I felt pretty hopeless at it, but now, the personal satisfaction cant be described really, it’s nature, the birds, the bees, the waterfalls, it’s freedom, it’s so beautiful. Everyday you see something that you don’t see the day before.

Way2Go Walktober – a chance to practice new habits and walk to school

way2goThe Government of South Australia’s Active School Travel program Way2Go is joining in Walktober SA by supporting more families and children to walk to school.

Way2Go Walktober, from October 15 to 31, is a chance to practice new habits. Walk to school with your children – just once a week will make a difference:

  • try once a week and build up
  • take turns with other families to walk with kids and make it fun
  • mix it up by riding a bike or scooter (You all can ride on the footpath)

Too far to walk the whole way? Park the car nearby and walk part of the way to school.

Read more tips, including about planning ahead and how to support your child at dpti.sa.gov.au/Way2Go/way2go_walktober

We know that using active travel to get to school is good for children’s physical health, as well as their growing brains, bones, muscles and imaginations!

Here at Walking SA we’re keen to see more children walking and cycling safely to school. View our Position Statement.

Throughout October we’re celebrating walking with WalktoberSA.

Keeping active can help you stay physically fit and mentally healthy

Shared via Beyond Blue:

Regular physical activity is a good way to help prevent or manage mild anxiety and depression. Keeping active can help you stay physically fit and mentally healthy.

Research shows that keeping active can:

  • help lift mood through improved fitness and the release of natural chemicals in the brain
  • help improve sleeping patterns
  • increase energy levels
  • help block negative thoughts and/or distract people from daily worries
  • help people feel less alone if they exercise with others.

Physical activity increases your wellbeing. The current recommendation is at least 30 minutes of moderate intensity physical activity on most, and preferably all, days of the week. However, people with anxiety or depression may find it difficult to get started or get motivated, or continue to exercise on a long-term basis.

View Beyond Blue’s:

  • tips to get started,
  • examples of activities,
  • or download their Activity Plan template.

beyondblue.org.au/get-support/staying-well/keeping-active

Throughout October we’re celebrating walking with #walktoberSA

Hiking with children: how walking as a child led to being an active adult

Story via the Friends of the Heysen Trail.

Amelia writes of her family’s tradition of walking the Heysen Trail as a child – she was very much reluctant to do this, preferring to read books and make craft – and how by the time she was in high school she had well and truly caught the activity bug and to this day is still an active walker.

Last year she started walking the Heysen Trail as a family again, but this time with her own children. The great thing about the Heysen Trail is you don’t need to try and tackle it all at once, and can do short walks closer to Adelaide.

She asked her eight-year-old son his thoughts on the walks they’d done so far:

‘One of my favourite sections was the boggy bits. The others squelched into the mud probably because you’re bigger. But me, I got through easier and was dancing around waiting at the end of the bog.’

‘I liked the green and the tweeting of the birds. I liked going over the fields in the sunshine. I loved looking at the old mines with their deep, dark holes. I liked the feeling of the grass rustling against my leg because it was so long. I loved going through the valleys and hearing the echoes of our voices, cooo-eeee.’

Read the full article on the Friends of the Heysen Trail website.

Walking can transform lives: psychologist Kylie Agnew on the benefits of walking for mental health

Walking transforms lives. Psychologist Kylie Agnew talks about her work with Operation Flinders using adventure activities for therapeutic populations. She saw people experience positive transformation through walking.

“Some of the changes I’ve seen in people have been huge, with the young people I’ve worked with, both on Operation Flinders and in other programs, seeing them change from the start to the finish of the eight days out in the wilderness. It’s been really inspirational. I was lucky enough to travel the world to see how some of these programs run in all different remote parts of the world. There’s a lot of people using walking to help people all around the world.”

Throughout October we’re celebrating walking with #walktoberSA

Transcript:

The World Health Organization recommends that we all walk everyday. I think we should be doing as much walking as possible, obviously within our busy lives, but making time to walk everyday is going to be important, but also building walking into our lives so that we all can benefit from walking, whether it’s physical and emotional or psychological benefit.

There’s a lot of different research that’s been done on why walking is good for mental health. Some of it’s been based obviously on the physical side, having general health, meaning that you’re going to be healthier mentally, but there’s also a lot of research to show that serotonin and different hormones are released when we walk and when we exercise, and then I guess we’ve also got that relationship building which is obviously another protective factor for mental health, building friendships, building relationships by spending time together.

For me personally, I just love being in the outdoors. It’s been a passion of mine since I grew up on a farm, and also going to university and studying adventure activities then moving into using adventure activities for therapeutic populations.

Some of the changes I’ve seen in people have been huge, with the young people I’ve worked with, both on Operation Flinders and in other programs, seeing them change from the start to the finish of the eight days out in the wilderness. It’s been really inspirational. I was lucky enough to travel the world to see how some of these programs run in all different remote parts of the world. There’s a lot of people using walking to help people all around the world.

Living a healthy lifestyle through joining a walking group and good nutrition: one man’s story of life with diabetes and rehabilitation

Glenn with his local Heart Foundation Walking group

Glenn with his local Heart Foundation Walking group

A great story of transformation through walking from Heart Foundation Walking:

Glenn McLennan was diagnosed with Diabetes in 2010 and by 2011 had his first operation on a foot. Unfortunately, complications set in in 2016 and by January 2017 both lower limbs were amputated.

12 months ago he joined his local Heart Foundation Walking group.

Walk Organiser Alison Gentles said, “He liked what he saw – a happy, friendly group and the flat surface because we walk at the shopping centre,” said Alison.

Glenn enjoys the social side of the group with the coffee catch up after the walk. With the support of the walking group, specialists and his local community; Glenn has a positive outlook and is committed to living a healthy lifestyle through walking and good nutrition. Glenn hopes his story will send a positive message to the younger generation about the importance of regular exercise and healthy eating.

Join a Heart Foundation Walking group to take positive steps to help reduce stress, have a healthier body, build stronger relationships, and most of all, be happy. With 128 groups across South Australia there’s sure to be one close to you.

Throughout October we’re celebrating walking with #walktoberSA

Article via Heart Foundation.