Winners of “View From My Walk” photo competition, week 1

View from my walk winners, week 1

The winners of our first week of the “view from my walk” photo competition are:

Thanks to ioMerino two people have each won a $50 vouchers. ioMerino not only make amazing, natural, thermal layers to help keep you comfortable for longer when you’re out hiking, they also happen to be a local South Australian company!

Week 1 Winners:

  1. Instagram user skipper_lisa for her photo of her family adventure time into Sturt Gorge Recreation Park.
  2. Facebook user Fi Abraham with her photo of sunrise at the top of Carrick Hill and Brownhill Creek.

Share your “view from my walk” photo using #walktoberSA for a chance to win a weekly prize throughout October – use #walktoberSA for a chance to win. View Week 2 prize details.

Take a walk in a nearby park, along the beach, along a river, in a national park or on your walk to work – anywhere in South Australia. October is ideal for walking – the temperatures are mild and the evenings are getting longer.

Good luck and enjoy a walk! You’re just two feet from some of the best places in South Australia.

Enter via Instagram or Twitter. Facebook users can post direct to our page via @WalkingSA to share their photo.

View terms and conditions.

The competition is part of #walktoberSA – celebrating walking throughout October.

Week 2: Share your “view from my walk” photo using #walktoberSA for a chance to win a weekly prize throughout October

Share your “view from my walk” photo using #walktoberSA for a chance to win a weekly prize throughout October.

Take a walk in a nearby park, along the beach, along a river, in a national park or on your walk to work – anywhere in South Australia. October is ideal for walking – the temperatures are mild and the evenings are getting longer.

The weekly prizes for the second week, thanks to Rays, is a set of two Leki Anti-shock Trail AS walking poles. With Rays you can find gear to go for a hike, a paddle, or camp, and outdoor clothing and footwear for men, women and kids. Visit their store on Main North Road, Enfield or shop online.

This week’s prizes will be drawn Monday 15/10/18. Last week’s winners were announced earlier today.

Good luck and enjoy a walk! You’re just two feet from some of the best places in South Australia.

Enter via Instagram or Twitter. Facebook users can post direct to our page via @WalkingSA to share their photo.

View terms and conditions.

The competition is part of #walktoberSA – celebrating walking throughout October.

Bob’s story of walking from 160kg to one million steps

Bob Ueckert walked from 160kg to one million steps

A great story of transformation through walking from Heart Foundation Walking:

Fifteen years ago, Bob Ueckert lost his ability to walk after suffering a stroke. At the time, he weighed more than 160 kilograms, had high blood pressure, high cholesterol, and due to his stroke, was paralysed on the entire left side of his body.

Bob underwent rehabilitation to learn to walk again, lost more than 80 kilos, and found a new lease on life.

Over the last few months he has been participating in the Heart Foundation’s Prime Minister’s One Million Steps. He wasn’t even a quarter of the way in before hitting the magic one-million step mark.

Walking for an average of 30 minutes a day can lower the risk of heart disease, stroke, and diabetes by 30 to 40 per cent, with evidence showing the benefits of walking also extend to the brain – improving learning and memory skills and reducing the risk of dementia and Alzheimer’s disease.

The Prime Minister’s One Million Steps is about supporting the 52 per cent of Australians who are not active enough to improve their health by walking. Although the current round of the progrm has stopped, you can still use the app to track your steps, receive challenges and have the chance of winning a weekly prize.

Heart Foundation National CEO, Adjunct Professor John Kelly, said it’s never too late to join the Prime Minister’s One Million Steps.

“Any level of walking is better than none at all, but more is even better, particularly when it comes to reducing your risk of heart disease,” he said.

“Whether it means a 10-minute walk today and a longer walk tomorrow, whether it means getting off the bus, tram or train one stop earlier, every bit counts, and people who do the least amount of walking are the ones with the most to gain.”

Throughout October we’re celebrating walking with #walktoberSA

Article via Heart Foundation.

Walking faster may lead to a longer, healthier life

Walking faster may lead to a longer, healthier life

Walking faster may lead to a longer, healthier life.
To improve your health you’ve got to huff and puff and step up the pace until you’re out of breath.

Walking at an average pace was associated with a 20 per cent risk reduction for all-cause mortality compared with walking at a slow pace, and walking at a fast pace was associated with a 24 per cent risk reduction.

For people aged over 60, the benefits increased: an average walking pace was associated with a 45 per cent reduction in cardiovascular disease risk, and fast or brisk walking, a 55 per cent reduction.

The study by Sydney University analysed more than 50,200 walkers. Their most valuable message is that you’ve got to huff and puff and step up the pace until you’re out of breath, because that will lead to improvements.

And another study in Canada has confirmed what many people already believed: Walking for older people, even less than the recommended guidelines and only at moderate speed, can add years to your life. The 13-year study followed 140,000 people with an average age of 70.

Experts have calculated some best practice guidelines for time spent walking weekly. It’s about 150 minutes of moderately intense activity, or about 30 minutes five times a week, with about half that — 75 minutes a week — as a minimum.

But the study has found that even if you’re not meeting the minimum, the act of walking is still extremely valuable.

“Even a little walking might help you live longer. It’s been called a perfect exercise, it’s easy, cheap, doesn’t require special equipment and it doesn’t even have to be fast walking. Most of the participants said they walked about four kilometres an hour.”

Feeling stressed out? Go for a walk.

Feeling stressed out? Go for a walk. The positive effects of a single exposure to nature make us feel happier for up to 7 hours.

Feeling stressed out?
Go for a walk.

The positive effects of a single exposure to nature make us feel happier for up to 7 hours.

We have long been aware of the positive effects of walking in nature can have on our mental health and wellbeing, and a study has found the positive effects of a single exposure to nature make us feel happier for up to 7 hours.

That means that walking to work in the morning, or taking the dog for a stroll first thing, can really leave you feeling happier all day.

The study by Urban Mind, including King’s College London, found that the benefits of experiencing nature on mental well-being are time-lasting and interact with an individual’s vulnerability to mental illness.

Park of the Month, Belair National Park, October 2018

Belair National Park is the National Parks and Wildlife Service SA Park of the Month for October 2018.

Belair National Park is close to Adelaide, nestled in the foothills. There are 8 hiking trails in the park, and another 2 hiking trails that pass through the park. The trails vary from Easy Walks to Hard Hikes. A couple of the Easy Walks are suitable for people of all abilities, including for wheelchair access, for those with mobility issues and for prams. The trails are of a high standard and are well marked.

The park is accessible by public transport train service and bus services. Vehicle entry is $12 per car, or $9.50 for concession, and visitors are encouraged to book online before you go, of use the self-service computer available for payment daily between 9am and 4:30pm. There is also a range of free events throughout the month, including guided Ranger Walks and Friends of Belair guided walks.

You can walk your dog in this park providing it remains under your control on a lead.

11 Great Walk and Hikes in Belair National Park

Wood Duck Walk, Belair National Park1.

Wood Duck Walk, Belair National Park

Walk suitable for prams and strollers Walk suitable for those with mobility issues including wheelchairs Walk suitable for dog walking

1km, 30 mins, Easy Walk

This pleasant walk around Playford Lake is popular with young children, people with prams, people with limited mobility, including wheelchairs, and those who want to experience the park’s wildlife, including the ducks on the lake.

For accessibily notes and an Accessible Map of Belair National Park, refer to the Accessibility page on the National Parks and Wildlife Service SA website.

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Best walks to see wildflowers and flowers in the Adelaide Hills and Fleurieu Peninsula

Explore some walking trails for see some of this Spring’s native wildflowers or other flowers.

We’ve listed some walking trails near Adelaide in the Adelaide Hills, and in parks and reserves on the Fleurieu Peninsula.

Thanks to everyone who has been entering our Spring photo competition of wildflowers you’ve seen when out walking on a trail, we’ve seen some great photos and places to walk. We’ve had four winners, one for each week of September, each winning a Multi Park Pass thanks to National Parks and Wildlife Service SA.

In this article:

  1. Wildflower and flowers walks in Adelaide and the Adelaide Hills
  2. Wildflower walks on the Fleurieu Peninsula
  3. Links to other articles to find wildflowers

Wildflowers… or weeds?

What do we mean by the term “wildflowers”? It is often understood to mean native Australian flowers growing freely in the wild. However… unfortunately some of the flowers we see growing alongside trails in our national parks and reserves are introduced species of flowers, which means they are weeds.

It could be subjective how much enjoyment someone derives from walking through nature and seeing these flowers – be they native wildflowers or introduced flowers (weeds).

Regardless – a quick public service announcement – don’t pick the flowers – either native wildflowers or weeds. The native wildflowers should be left as-is, so they keep growing in the wild. And some weeds shouldn’t be picked and transported, because it tends to encourage them to spread.

Generally in the walks we’ve listed below, we’ve tried to show native wildflowers, but we acknowledge that some of the photos will invariably be of introduced species – weeds. And a couple of the walking trails below include flowers we very much know are not native to Australia, but we’ve included the trail destinations as they’re great places to walk and see flowers and nature.

1. Wildflower and flowers walks in Adelaide and the Adelaide Hills

Black Hill Conservation Park

In Anstey Hill Recreation Park explore the wildflowers on the Black Hill Summit Hike (4.2km return Hard Hike) or the Ambers Gully Hike and Sugarloaves Trail (4.4km circuit, Moderate Hike).

georginagentle georginagentleBlack Hill
georginagentle georginagentleBlack Hill

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Walking can transform your life, Bernie’s story of walking to a healthier life

Walking can transform your life, by improving your physical health and social connections. Bernie Victory talks about how getting involved in a charity walk led to losing weight, feeling healthier, and making new friends. He has found walking to inspire him to travel both locally and overseas to walking destinations.

“I find that the group I walk with, they’re a group of people with a huge range of skills. I think that’s one of the great things about walking, you can be together as equals within an enormous number and enormousness range of people, and it’s a great equality.”

Throughout October we’re celebrating walking with #walktoberSA

Transcript:

I’m in a walking group that doesn’t actually have a name. It’s just a loose collection of people that are strung together by a weekly email, but there’s about 200 people that get the email, and on every Saturday there’d be somewhere between 20 and 50 people walking.

I find that the group I walk with, they’re a group of people with a huge range of skills. I think that’s one of the great things about walking, you can be together as equals within an enormous number and enormousness range of people, and it’s a great equality.

The way the walking works is there will be a walk, and there’ll be coffee at the end of the walk, and at the end of coffee someone will say “Has anyone been to Mt Hayfield?”, or “I want to go to Borneo, and do the death march,” and I just recently came back from the Bungle Bungles, and to find places in Australia that I didn’t know existed, that were just so beautiful, and just so stunning, I was in awe for days.

Every coffee leads to another walk, and every walk leads to more contacts and more connections.

It was 2003, and I had decided to do the Kodaka Track. It was a fundraiser for work, and it came at just the right time, because I got very unfit over the last twenty or so years, and I was significantly overweight, and I knew that if I was going to do the Kodaka Track I would have to walk, I’d have to train. Doing the Kokoda with people, who six months before could barely get out of bed, and wouldn’t get out of bed, to see them reach a level of fitness, and to finish the track, and that sheer moment of joy, that’s always a moment of great inspiration.

Share your “view from my walk” photo using #walktoberSA for a chance to win a weekly prize throughout October

Share your “view from my walk” photo using #walktoberSA for a chance to win a weekly prize throughout October.

Take a walk in a nearby park, along the beach, along a river, in a national park or on your walk to work – anywhere in South Australia. October is ideal for walking – the temperatures are mild and the evenings are getting longer.

The weekly prizes for the first week, thanks to ioMerino are two $50 vouchers. ioMerino not only make amazing, natural, thermal layers to help keep you comfortable for longer when you’re out hiking, they also happen to be a local South Australian company!

This week’s prizes will be drawn Monday 8/10/18.

Good luck and enjoy a walk! You’re just two feet from some of the best places in South Australia.

Enter via Instagram or Twitter. Facebook users can post direct to our page via @WalkingSA to share their photo.

View terms and conditions.

The competition is part of #walktoberSA – celebrating walking throughout October.

Walking SA Board member Ben Trewren has been successful in receiving a Churchill Fellowship

Walking SA Board member Ben Trewren has been successful in receiving a Churchill FellowshipToday the Winston Churchill Memorial Trust has awarded $3.1 million worth of Churchill Fellowships to 112 Australians. One of the recipients is our very own Walking SA Board member Ben Trewren, being awarded the Terry Lavender Scholarship. This scholarship provides opportunities for South Australians to investigate ways to develop, improve, manage, and promote outdoor recreational trails and pursuits in South Australia.

The Winston Churchill Memorial Trust’s aim is to provide an opportunity for Australians to travel overseas to conduct research in their chosen field that is not readily available in Australia. The Trust was established in 1965 to honour the memory of Sir Winston Churchill, and fulfil his wish for people from all walks of life to travel the world to gain new knowledge and share ideas and insights. Ten South Australians were awarded a fellowship.

Ben’s project will allow him to research how engaging people in shared trails can assist in building the outdoor community. Ben hope’s to honour Terry’s legacy by harnessing this opportunity to uncover new ideas, attitudes and implementation strategies to build the profile/useability of outdoor recreation trails for all types of users. Ben will be travelling to New Zealand, USA, Canada, United Kingdom, Switzerland and Netherlands.

Find out more about the project in Ben’s presentation at our AGM at 6:30pm Thursday 11 October 2018.

New Position Statements by Walking SA: The Green Man; Walking Safely to School; Quality Footpaths

Our vision here at Walking SA’s is to see more people walking more often. We’ve recently developed three new Position Statements on a range of issues affecting people walking for recreation, health, or transport.

Over coming months we’ll be releasing more.

The Green Man: Improving pedestrian signal phasing at intersections and other signalised crossing points

Walking SA calls for the development of state-wide pedestrian traffic signal guidelines.
Walking SA calls for councils to review pedestrian signal phasing at intersections and crossing points in busy pedestrian areas, in order to reduce pedestrian wait times.


Enable and encourage children to walk and cycle safely to school

Walking SA encourages the government to develop an integrated active travel strategy that includes boosting of funds for implementing the Way2Go program in every school in SA.


Quality footpaths: Pedestrian infrastructure that encourages people to walk

We need a pedestrian environment that encourages and not discourages people to walk to local destinations. Footpaths are fundamental to people’s ability to walk about in urban areas including to and from public transport. The quality of the pedestrian environment indicates much we value walking in our society. Indeed, it is a key marker on how civilized and sophisticated a society is.

Spring 2018 Competition, winner week 3 – best walking trails to see wildflowers

Instagram user muddy_pies has won this week's wildflower walk photo competition with her photo of the Twiggy Bush-pea wildflower seen on the one of the Wildflower Wander in Anstey Hill Recreation Park.Instagram user muddy_pies has won this week’s wildflower walk photo competition with her photo of the Twiggy Bush-pea wildflower seen on the Wildflower Wander in Anstey Hill Recreation Park.

The Wildflower Wander is a 1.3km one-way trail, walk up hill and return by the same route or return on some of the Pink Gum Loop. There are 11 trail options and loops in the park.

Enter our Spring photo competition of wildflowers you’ve seen when out walking on a trail for a chance to win a Multi Park Pass thanks to National Parks and Wildlife Service SA.

To enter your photos:

  1. Take a photo on any walking trail anywhere in South Australia
  2. Include the name of the trail and park or reserve in your post
  3. Share your photo on Instagram, Twitter or Facebook using the hashtags: #wildflowers #walktoberSA
  4. Photo must be taken in August or September 2018

Please note due to Facebook privacy settings Facebook posts need to be shared to our Facebook page facebook.com/walkingSA. People without social media can send their entries to photo.competition@walkingsa.org.au.

We’re not looking for the best photographer but instead great places to go for short, medium or long walks to see wildflowers.

A prize of a 1 x Multi Park Pass thanks to National Parks and Wildlife Service SA will be awarded each Friday: Fri 7th Sept 2018, Fri 14th Sept 2018, Fri 21st Sept 2018, Fri 28th Sept 2018. Winners will be notified by private messaging and public comment on the applicable social media network. A Multi Park Pass is valued at $90 and provides 12 months of unlimited vehicle entry to 11 national parks.

This competition is part of #walktoberSA, celebrating walking next month during October.

Spring 2018 Competition, winner week 2 – best walking trails to see wildflowers

Instagram user Illy has won this week's wildflower walk photo competition with her photo of wildflowers seen on the one of the Beaumont Circuit hikes, part of the Burnside Walks network.Instagram user Illy Graetz has won this week’s wildflower walk photo competition with her photo of wildflowers seen on the one of the Beaumont Circuit hikes, part of the Burnside Walks network.

There are 10 walking trail options in the Burnside Walks network. The trails are around the foothills near Burnside, Mt Osmond Reserve, and in the adjoining Chambers Gully. There are walk options from 1 hour up to 3-4 hours.

Enter our Spring photo competition of wildflowers you’ve seen when out walking on a trail for a chance to win a Multi Park Pass thanks to National Parks and Wildlife Service SA.

To enter your photos:

  1. Take a photo on any walking trail anywhere in South Australia
  2. Include the name of the trail and park or reserve in your post
  3. Share your photo on Instagram, Twitter or Facebook using the hashtags: #wildflowers #walktoberSA
  4. Photo must be taken in August or September 2018

Please note due to Facebook privacy settings Facebook posts need to be shared to our Facebook page facebook.com/walkingSA. People without social media can send their entries to photo.competition@walkingsa.org.au.

We’re not looking for the best photographer but instead great places to go for short, medium or long walks to see wildflowers.

A prize of a 1 x Multi Park Pass thanks to National Parks and Wildlife Service SA will be awarded each Friday: Fri 7th Sept 2018, Fri 14th Sept 2018, Fri 21st Sept 2018, Fri 28th Sept 2018. Winners will be notified by private messaging and public comment on the applicable social media network. A Multi Park Pass is valued at $90 and provides 12 months of unlimited vehicle entry to 11 national parks.

This competition is part of #walktoberSA, celebrating walking next month during October.

Spring 2018 Competition, winner week 1 – best walking trails to see wildflowers

Instragram user scubacoops has won this week's wildflower walk photo competition with her photo of wildflowers seen in Kuitpo Forest.Instagram user scubacoops has won this week’s wildflower walk photo competition with her photo of wildflowers seen in Kuitpo Forest.

There are 4 shared-use trails in Kuitpo Forest and 2 walking trails in the adjacent Kyeema Conservation Park. The Heysen Trail pass through both parks. The Forest and Park are a mix of plantation pine forest and native scrub. View the walks and trails.

Enter our Spring photo competition of wildflowers you’ve seen when out walking on a trail for a chance to win a Multi Park Pass thanks to National Parks and Wildlife Service SA.

To enter your photos:

  1. Take a photo on any walking trail anywhere in South Australia
  2. Include the name of the trail and park or reserve in your post
  3. Share your photo on Instagram, Twitter or Facebook using the hashtags: #wildflowers #walktoberSA
  4. Photo must be taken in August or September 2018

Please note due to Facebook privacy settings Facebook posts need to be shared to our Facebook page facebook.com/walkingSA. People without social media can send their entries to photo.competition@walkingsa.org.au.

We’re not looking for the best photographer but instead great places to go for short, medium or long walks to see wildflowers.

A prize of a 1 x Multi Park Pass thanks to National Parks and Wildlife Service SA will be awarded each Friday: Fri 7th Sept 2018, Fri 14th Sept 2018, Fri 21st Sept 2018, Fri 28th Sept 2018. Winners will be notified by private messaging and public comment on the applicable social media network. A Multi Park Pass is valued at $90 and provides 12 months of unlimited vehicle entry to 11 national parks.

This competition is part of #walktoberSA, celebrating walking next month during October.

Walks and trails in Kuitpo Forest and Kyeema Conservation Park

Explore 4 shared-use trails in Kuitpo Forest and 2 walking trails in the adjacent Kyeema Conservation Park. The Heysen Trail pass through both parks.

Kuitpo Forest is 60% plantation pine forest, with the rest native scrub. In the adjacent Kyeema Conservation Park there is dense natural scrub.

6 Walking Trails in Kuitpo Forest and Kyeema Conservation Park

Chookarloo Walk, Kuitpo Forest1.

Chookarloo Walk, Kuitpo Forest

1.1km, 30mins

Walk suitable for dog walking Trail shared by mountain bikers

Experience the pine forest and native scrub around Chookarloo Campground on this short walk. The walk starts from the Chookarloo Campground at one of the footbridges, entering the dark forest shady forest. The circuit is great for kids, offering lots of fallen trees and other nature place experiences.


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