Cape Gantheaume Coastal Trek

Seasonal Closures

  • The Cape Gantheaume headland is subject to seasonal closures, usually from May through to the end of December. Check the National Park website for updates.
  • People must discuss their plans with park ranger.
Walking Trail Facts
Distance
33 km one way
Duration
2 days one way
Suitable for
Hiking
Trail Class
Grade 5, Trek
Terrain
Flat
Park (national park, conservation park, forest, reserve)
Cape Gantheaume Conservation Park and Wilderness Protected Area
Region
Kangaroo Island
Download maps & GPS files
  1. 2 GPS files
  2. 1 website link
Jump to Downloads section
Photos
8 photos
Travel options
  1. Car
Travel time from Adelaide
2+ hours
Cape Gantheaume Coastal Trek

About the Walking Trail

Hike along the wild and rugged south coast of Kangaroo Island out to the headland of Cape Gantheaume, where there is an isolated pristine beach dotted with New Zealand fur-seals.

The first 6km heading east from Bales Beach is a series of isolated sandy beaches. Continuing east, the walking is along cliffs out to Cape Gantheaume. There is a beach at Cape Gantheaume on the western side. The coast west of  Cape Gantheaume is predominately cliffs with a beach near the end, before the walk comes out into a carpark at Sewer Beach, a rocky beach in D’Estrees Bay.

The hike is challenging and requires careful planning:

  1. the hike is 2-days one-way
  2. camping at the Cape Gantheaume headland is recommended. There is no campsite
  3. there is no water on this walk so you must carry water for 2 days of hiking. There is a rainwater tank in the carpark at Bales Bay (and Seal Bay is a 4km further west). The closest water in D’Estrees Bay is at Wreckers Beach which is 2.5km west of the Sewer Beach trailhead.)
  4. for most of the walk there is no trail (there is a rough fire track from D’Estress Bay to Cape Gantheaume headland)
  5. people must discuss their plans with park rangers. View the Trekking Information Sheet.
  6. The Cape Gantheaume headland is subject to seasonal closures, usually from May through to the end of December. Check the National Park website for updates. The closure is to protect white-bellied sea eagles, which are vulnerable to breeding disruption along this coastline – as the eagles can see people approaching from many kilometres away, and eagles protect their nests as they raise their young. The eagles return to the same nest each year.

Downloads

Download KML/KMZ file
Download GPX file

Photos