Yeldulknie Conservation Park Hiking Trail

Walking Trail Facts
Distance
6.9 km return
Duration
1 - 3 hours
Suitable for
Hiking
Difficulty
Moderate
Terrain
Steep
Park (national park, conservation park, forest, reserve)
Yeldulknie Conservation Park
Region
Eyre Peninsula
Download maps & GPS files
  1. 1 map PDF
  2. 1 GPS file
Jump to Downloads section
Photos
4 photos
Travel options
  1. Car
Travel time from Adelaide
2+ hours
Yeldulknie Conservation Park Hiking Trail

About the Walking Trail

The Yeldulknie Conservation Park Hiking Trail is located in the Yeldulknie Conservation Park and can be accessed from Mangalo Road, Cleve (Eyre Peninsula). The Yeldulknie Conservation Park was proclaimed on 21 September 1989 in an effort to protect approximately 3283 hectares of Mallee Woodlands, and in particular the Senna Wattle (Acacia praemorsa). There is an abundance of flora and fauna to see on the trails, more information on the park and the trails can be found in the car park adjacent to the trail. Be mindful of cars when you cross the road.

The hike has a number of different options to suit fitness levels, age groups and abilities. Among the bush, is a safe environment for a range of wildlife – you may a spot a kangaroo, emu or goat or two!

Beautiful after a good rain and during the winter months, the creek beds are flowing and the waterfalls are gushing, creating a serene experience for anyone looking to embrace nature. There are a number of different flora and fauna species and a perfect place for birdwatching too if you are that way inclined.

There are 4 trail length options (all follow the same 2.2km at the start to the main Waterfall):

  Waterfall Hike, 4.4km return

Gradient: Short steep inclines and/or declines.
Quality of path: Clearly defined track, water crossings.
Warnings: Slippery when wet, stay clear from cliff edges.

Highlights:

  • Creek
  • Waterfall
  • Flora
  • Rest stops
  • Photo opportunities

  Small Waterfall, 4.8km return

Gradient: Minimal incline and/or decline.
Quality of path: Bush trails, look out for white markers.
Warnings: Slippery when wet, stay clear from cliff edges.

Highlights:

  • Waterfall
  • Photo opportunities

  Lookout, 5km return

Gradient: Minimal incline and/or decline.
Quality of path: Bush trails, look out for white markers.
Warnings: Slippery when wet.

Highlights:

  • Lookout
  • Photo opportunities

  Lookout Loop, 6.9km loop

Gradient: Very steep, long inclines and/or declines.
Quality of path: Bush trails, look out for blue markers.
Warnings: Slippery when wet.

Highlights:

  • Creek
  • Flora
  • Waterfall

A ‘Friends of the Trail’ volunteer group manage and maintain the trail where possible. It is a well established animal track and there are a number of markers to ensure you don’t go off track.

Bushwalking involves risks and should be undertaken with care and regard for the conditions at all times. Trails are subject to natural forces and vary over time. This may make trail use more challenging. As with all bushwalking, you should check fire danger ratings before commencing your hike. This park and trails are closed on days of Catastrophic Fire Danger, Extreme Fire Danger, Extreme Fire Danger and days when a Total Fire Ban is declared. Listen to the local area radio station (ABC radio station 639AM) for the latest updates and information on fire safety, or visit the CFS website or phone the CFS Hotline on 1300 362 361.

Photos